For the Sake of National Security and Stability, Bring Back the Military Draft

Western history’s tradition of universal military service reaches back millennia, and with good reason: “…young men began their early training with military service so that they might grow accustomed to command by obeying, and learn how to lead by following others….” [i]  In fact, “To run for office [in the Roman world], according to Polybius, ten years’ military service was required….” [ii] In the United States of America awareness of this is reflected in the Selective Service Act as administered by the Selective Service System.     

Yet it seems that many jeremiads regarding American youth in the days before World War II apply still: “A Gallup poll of October 1940 found a prevailing view of American youth as “a flabby, pacifistic, yellow, cynical, discouraged, and leftist lot.” [iii] Think of the disruptive behavior of many within the American Academy. Then ask yourself, “Why is this so? Why is it tolerated? Who is behind this?”

We are again at war and ought to reinstitute the draft to better go after those who would destroy us. We should do so without delay. We should also do so because it would better make young men grown up…


[i] Pliny, Letters, Books VIII-X, Panegyricus, The Loeb Classical Library (LCL 59), Edited by Jeffrey Henderson, Page 35, year 2004.

[ii] Cannae, The Experience of Battle in the Second Punic War, by Gregory Daly, ©2002, Routledge, London and New York, Page 121.

[iii] An Army at Dawn, The War in North Africa, 1942-1943, Copyright © 2002 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 9.

 

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Inside the mind of a liberal…

H. L. Mencken

H. L. Mencken

“Mencken, a great admirer of the Kaiser, characterized American democracy as “the worship of jackals by jackasses.”

 “Taking its cue from Mencken, the liberalism that emerged from 1919 was contemptuous of American culture and politics. For the liberals, the war years had revealed that America society and democracy were themselves agents of repression. These sentiments deepened during the 1920s and have been an ongoing current in liberalism ever since.” [i]

[i] The Revolt Against the Masses, copyright © 2013 by Fred Siegel, Encounter Books, Page 41.

 

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The New Civics Offerings at Universities and Colleges, and the Nonsensical Social Justice

Simone Weil, 1909-1943

Simone Weil, 1909-1943

“’The social order’, [Simone] writes, ‘is irreducibly that of the prince of this world. Our only duty with regard to the social is to try to limit the evil of it. . . . Something of the social labeled divine; an intoxicating mixture which brings about every sort of license―the devil disguised.’” ― Weil, Gravity and Grace, Copyright © Librarie PLON, first published in Routledge Classics 2002 by Routledge, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon O14 4 RN, 711 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10017, Page xxxvii.

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Wisdom Concerning ‘The Media’ from the Pre-Political Correctness Age

General Ulysses S. Grant

General Ulysses S. Grant

“Correspondents of the press were ever on hand to hear every word dropped, and were not always disposed to report correctly what did not conform to their preconceived notions, either about the conduct of the war or the individuals concerned in it.” ― Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, published by Konecky & Konecky, New York, Page 213.

“I always admired the South, as bad as I thought their cause, for the boldness with which they silenced all opposition and all croaking, by press or by individuals, within their control.  War at all times, whether a civil war between sections of a common country or between nations, ought to be avoided, if possible with honor.  But, once entered into, it is too much for human nature to tolerate an enemy within their ranks to give aid and comfort to the armies of the opposing section or nation.” ― Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, published by Konecky & Konecky, New York, Page 263.

General Sherman, 1820-1891

General Sherman, 1820-1891

“…overwhelming necessity overrides all law.” ― Sherman, Memoirs, by William Tecumseh Sherman, The Library of America, ©1990 by Literary Classics of the United States, Inc., New York, NY, Page 657.

 “Every attempt to make war easy and safe will result in humiliation and disaster.” ― Sherman, Memoirs, by William Tecumseh Sherman, The Library of America, ©1990 by Literary Classics of the United States, Inc., New York, NY, Page 657.

“Newspaper correspondents with an army, as a rule, are mischievous.  They are the world’s gossips, pick up and retail the camp scandal, and gradually drift to the headquarters of some general, who finds it easier to make reputation at home than with his own corps or division.  They are also tempted to prophesy events and state facts which, to an enemy, reveal a purpose in time to guard against it.  Moreover, they are always bound to see facts colored by the partisan or political character of their own patrons, and thus bring army officers into the political controversies of the day, which are always mischievous and wrong.  Yet, so greedy are the people at large for war news, that it is doubtful whether any army commander can exclude all reporters, without bringing down on himself a clamor that may imperil his own safety.  Time and moderation must bring a just solution to this modern difficulty.” ― Sherman, Memoirs, by William Tecumseh Sherman, The Library of America, ©1990 by Literary Classics of the United States, Inc., New York, NY, Page 899.

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What’s in a word?

What’s in a word?

Well, a lot, and so I agree with Dr. Lukacs that… “The great danger in our present passage from a verbal to a visual “culture” is latent in the impoverishment of language.” [i]

An example of this may be found in the contemporary use of the word, hero, which time and habit have cheapened or at the very least confused, but first, some definitions of hero from the current print edition of the Oxford English Dictionary:

(1) Antiq. A name given (as in Homer) to men of superhuman strength, courage, or ability, favoured by the gods; at a later time regarded as intermediate gods and men, and immortal.

(2) A man distinguished by extraordinary valour and martial achievements; one who does brave or noble deeds; an illustrious warrior.

(3) A man who exhibits extraordinary bravery, firmness, fortitude, or greatness of soul, in any course of action, or in connexion with any pursuit, work, or enterprise; a man admired and venerated for his achievements and noble qualities.

Consider the use of hero to describe an historical event: “[T]he exploration of lands beyond Europe ─ of which [Ferdinand] Magellan’s voyage was to be the culmination ─ opened the entire world, thus introducing the modern age.” [ii]

Now consider this observation: “Heroism is often confused with physical courage.  In fact the two are very different.  There was nothing heroic about [Ferdinand] Magellan’s death.  He went into that last darkness a seasoned campaigner, accompanied by his own men, and he was completely fearless because as he drew his last breath he believed ─ he knew ─ that paradise was imminent.  Similarly, the soldier who throws himself on a live grenade, surrendering his life to save his comrades, may be awarded the medal of honor.  Nevertheless his deed, being impulsive, is actually unheroic.  Such acts, no more reflective than the swift withdrawal of a blistered hand from a red-hot stove, are involuntary.  Heroism is the exact opposite ─always deliberate, never mindless.” [my emphasis] [iii]

“The hero acts alone, without encouragement, relying solely on conviction and his own inner resources.  Shame does not discourage him; neither does obloquy.  Indifferent to approval, reputation, wealth or love, he cherishes only his personal sense of honor, which permits no one else to judge.  La Rochefoucauld, not always a cynic, wrote of him that he does “without witnesses that we would be capable of doing before everyone.”  Guided by an inner gyroscope, he pursues his vision single-mindedly, undiscouraged by rejections, defeat, or even the prospect of imminent death.  Few men can even comprehend such fortitude.  Virtually all crave some external incentive: the appreciation of peers, the possibility of exculpation, the promise of retroactive affection, the hope of rewards, applause, decorations ─ of emotional reparations in some form.  Because these longings are completely normal, only a man with towering strength of character can suppress them.” [iv]

“The ultimate authority on the English language, the Oxford English Dictionary, is to update the definition of the word ‘hero’ as part of an ongoing effort to reflect the contemporary use of words. The change is inspired by widespread usage of the word to describe anyone who is vaguely helpful, including people who deliver mail in inclement weather, and those who make the evening news for reasons other than committing a crime, according to OED editor-in-chief, Brendan Smythe.” [v]

Smythe’s observation: “Previously when a parent would say ‘you’re my hero’ to a child who picked up their toys, they were alluding to the original definition in a knowingly erroneous fashion to emphasize they appreciated the action. But these days they appear to really mean it – their child is an actual hero to them – and we must take account of that if we are to remain relevant.”

Far from representing an abrupt change in usage, this follows a longstanding trend in the downgrading of the noun.

“In Classical Greece a hero was a person of superhuman strength who inspired the known world, which devolved to meaning an ordinary mortal displaying ‘exceptional bravery and self sacrifice’ in the 20th century, before morphing into our current understanding as ‘someone who does or might do something useful’, as well as a particular type of sandwich.”

The change means there will be no longer be a specific noun to accurately describe people who rush into burning buildings or throw themselves on grenades to prevent or minimize harm to others.

“For now we suggest using compound descriptions, such as ‘exceptionally brave and noteworthy person’, or similar.”

The new definition will be included in the next printed edition, and appear in the online version shortly beforehand. Also being changed is the word ‘miracle’, which now denotes ‘something slightly unexpected that turns out well’, and ‘genius’ which henceforth is defined as ‘someone who is inclined to think from time to time’.

Now, a question: “Does this improve communications, understanding, or contribute value to the power of language? Does it not, instead, reduce the real hero to mundane status; to nothing? Does it not delete a once usefully descriptive term from our lexicon?”


This is not a complaint but rather a question…


[i] Remembered Past; On History, Historians, and Historical Knowledge, by John Lukacs, Chapter I, Page 15, edited by Mark G. Malvasi and Jeffrey O. Nelson, ISI Books, Wilmington, Delaware, © 2005 ISI Books.

[ii] A World Lit Only by Fire, The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance, Copyright © 1992 by William Manchester, Little Brown, Page 197.

[iii] A World Lit Only by Fire, The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance, Copyright © 1992 by William Manchester, Little Brown, Page 287.

[iv] A World Lit Only by Fire, The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance, Copyright © 1992 by William Manchester, Little Brown, Page 288.

[v] From the satirical blog serving Western Pennsylvania and beyond: http://www.breakingburgh.com/

William Manchester

William Manchester

Dr. John Lukacs, Historian

Dr. John Lukacs, Historian

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“During the twentieth century the capacity and the practice of listening have deteriorated. In all walks of life, in all kinds of circumstances, the capacity of attention has become disrupted and curtailed because of the incredible―literally incredible―amount of noise and sounds and music and words and slogans whirling around people’s heads and ears.” – Lukacs

In this regard, the press ought to abandon their stubborn use of the term “radical” when writing or speaking about Islamic terror. There is no radical in Islam. The entire religion is radical, and to its most intimate core, to wit:

  • “The Quran commands Muslims to go and rule the entire world and submit all mankind to the religion of Islam.  That is the basis of war in Islam.”
  • “Ordinary Muslims really believe that Jews are evil people who should be avoided.”
  • “The most important thing to remember… is that during all his time in Mecca, and for the first year in Medina, Muhammad tried to make Islam attractive to Jews.”
  • “Previously, Muhammad instructed his followers to face Jerusalem to pray.  In January 624 he changed direction to face Mecca.” ―The Unfinished Battle Islam and the Jews, by Mark A. Gabriel, Ph.D., Charisma House, Lake Mary, Florida, Pages 52 & 59 & 76 & 102. //From Dr. Gabriel’s Website. ̶   Mark Gabriel was born and raised in Egypt. More than just a practicing Muslim, he was a scholar from his youth. His first milestone was to complete memorization of the Quran at age twelve. He went on to attend Al-Azhar University in Cairo, Egypt, the oldest, most prestigious Muslim University in the world, where he earned bachelor’s, master’s, and doctorate degrees in History and culture. He also holds a master’s degree in world religion and a doctorate in Christian education. He travels and lectures for a variety of groups all over the world.

-Related-


“Opportunism is something for which intellectuals have especial talents because of their aptitude for managing vocabulary at the expense of thought….”  Confessions of An Original Sinner, Copyright ©1990 by John Lukacs, St. Augustine’s Press ♦ South Bend, Indiana 2000, Page 27.

“…so many American intellectuals talk of the common people as if they were idiots….” ― Historical Consciousness, Copyright © 1968 by John Lukacs, Harper & Row, Publishers, Page 92.

“In any event, around 1900, a certain skepticism about the cult of Facts began to appear even in England.  “The English,” said [Oscar] Wilde, “are always degrading truths into facts.  When a truth becomes a fact it loses all of its intellectual value.” ― Historical Consciousness, Copyright © 1968 by John Lukacs, Harper & Row, Publishers, Page 101.

“…the movement of ideas prevailing among political and intellectual elites in a democracy may be in profound discord with the sentiments and opinions of large masses of people….” ― Historical Consciousness, Copyright © 1968 by John Lukacs, Harper & Row, Publishers, Page 146.

“Like many intellectuals, he was incapable of saying a simple thing in a simple way.” ― Proust; Remembrance of Things Past, Volume 1, page 941.

“To paraphrase Orwell, some theories are so absurd that only intellectuals can believe them.” ─ The End of the Experiment, The Rise of Cultural Elites and the Decline of America’s Civic Culture, Stanley Rothman, Copyright © 2016 by Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick, New Jersey, Page viii.

“Intellectuals remained for him one of the most suspicious phenomena of modern civilization: “Consciously or not, they dream of a world governed by pawns, because they themselves are pawns.”  They are full of theories they have come up with out of the blue, and they insist on looking at reality exclusively through these.” ― Bernanos: An Ecclesial Existence, by Hans Urs Von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, ISBN 0-89870-576-2, Page 38.

“For teachers who when they set about giving their lessons keep in view their own great superiority and not the capacity of their pupils, are simpletons, who are not aware how vast is the difference between a lesson and a display.” — Philo, Volume II, edited by Jeffrey Henderson, The Loeb Classical Library (LCL 227), Page 411, year 2001.

There is a “…far more lethal form of narcissism dominates and leads the parade of self-regard that is destroying our culture, even gnawing away at the fabric of Western Civilization itself, which is on the verge of disintegration, excessive as that may sound.

That form is moral narcissism ̶ a pathology that underlies the whole liberal Left ethic today and some of the Right as well.” ̶ I Know Best, How Moral Narcissism is Destroying our Republic, if it Hasn’t Already, Copyright © 2016 by Roger L. Simon, Encounter Books, New York – London, Page 9.

“Hollywood stars, media personalities, and many politicians are prototypes of this behavior, but we are all prey to it. Look behind almost every issue of our day ̶ climate, environment, energy, gun control, defense, foreign affairs, terrorism, education, income inequality, immigration, race (especially), women’s rights, gay rights, political correctness (the mother lode of moral narcissism), microagressions and trigger warnings (moral narcissism as modern day opera bouffe), media bias, cultural and entertainment bias, not to mention the very size and scope of government itself ̶ and you will find the profound influence of moral narcissism, almost always for the worse. It is the prime hidden motor for our society, pointing to our republic’s demise because it makes people blind to reality and democracy moot.”  ̶ I Know Best, How Moral Narcissism is Destroying our Republic, if it Hasn’t Already, Copyright © 2016 by Roger L. Simon, Encounter Books, New York – London, Page 13.

““The ends justify the means” is almost the perfect catchphrase for moral narcissism.” .”  ̶ I Know Best, How Moral Narcissism is Destroying our Republic, if it Hasn’t Already, Copyright © 2016 by Roger L. Simon, Encounter Books, New York – London, Page 15.

“…the new rights-based client groups that came of age with McGovernism looked to courts and bureaucracies to deliver their demands. They were, at times, defiantly anti-majoritarian. Abortion, racial quotas, and environmental overreach were delivered not primarily by presidential or congressional majorities but by class-action lawsuits and by the iron triangle of interest groups, congressional subcommittees, and the liberal media.” ─ The Revolt Against the Masses, copyright © 2013 by Fred Siegel, Encounter Books, Page 172.

“H.G. Wells and George Bernard Shaw were among the liberal icons who petitioned for Sacco and Vanzetti’s release. One of the rare liberal dissenters from what soon became quasi-religious dogma was the revered Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, who had been saved by postal inspectors from a bomb mailed to him. When liberals implored him to throw his judicial weight into halting the impending executions, Holmes commented tartly: “My prejudices are against the convictions … they are stronger still against the run of shriekers. The lovers of justice have emphasized their love by blowing up a building or two.” As for the intellectuals, their case “wasn’t a matter of reason but simply shrieking because the world is not the world they want ─ a trouble most of us feel in some way. The intellectuals, he concluded, “seem to have gotten hysterical and to have lost their sense of proportion.” ─ The Revolt Against the Masses, copyright © 2013 by Fred Siegel, Encounter Books, Page 60.

“The disdain for Reagan freed liberals from the need to rethink their policies. Besides, Reagan’s victory, shock that it was, left the interest-group structure of congressional government intact. Intertwined with congressional committees and the media, liberal interest groups thrived by “parceling out to private parties the power to make public policy,” explained political scientist Theodore Lowi. Liberal interests never re-examined their assumptions, even when faced with social and political failure. They never asked why, despite the vast sums expended, poverty had become worse rather than better. Instead, they pointed to shards of success and, more significantly, in the hopes of maintaining their grip, redefined the problem. Great Society social programs originally designed to reduce if not eliminate poverty [among blacks] were now justified in terms of rights, racial justices, or diversity. And then there was fallback to the fallback: the insistence on good intentions rather than outcomes.” ─ The Revolt Against the Masses, copyright © 2013 by Fred Siegel, Encounter Books, Page 160.


I Know Best

Scholar Stanley Rothman, 1927 - 2011

Scholar Stanley Rothman, 1927 – 2011

Fred Siegel

Fred Siegel

Fred Siegel's The Revolt Against the Masses

Fred Siegel’s The Revolt Against the Masses

Dr. Gabriel

Dr. Gabriel

Georges Bernanos 1888 - 1948

Georges Bernanos
1888 – 1948

Dr. John Lukacs, Historian

Dr. John Lukacs, Historian

Philo, born ca. 20 B.C.

Philo, born ca. 20 B.C.

 

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The following is presented during the Christmas Season not out of hubris or narcissism, but from an insatiable curiosity to know – Peter Solstad

“The known and visible and measurable conditions of the universe are not anterior but consequent to our existence and to our consciousness.  The universe is such as it is because at the center of it there exist conscious and participant human beings who can see it, explore it, study it.  This insistence on the centrality and on the uniqueness of human beings is a statement not of arrogance but of humility.  It is yet another recognition of the inevitable limitations of mankind.”[i]  And, “…the purpose of history is the reduction of untruths….”[ii] and so, I offer the following anecdotes taken from history not as answers, but as justly ponderable – Peter Solstad, Ewa Beach, Hawaii…

Peter, 1947

Peter, 1947

Peter, 2016

Peter, 2016

 


image001


“God, the unchanging source of being, exists in a timeless present.  St. Thomas called it the “nunc stans,” “the ‘now’ that stands still.”  This timelessness is also asserted by Christ in the New Testament, when he makes the astonishing statement about himself, “Before Abraham was, I AM”. (John 8:58) ― Modern Physics and Ancient Faith, Stephen M. Barr, University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, Indiana ©2003, Page 263.

“…if we don’t want to misunderstand Bernanos at a fundamental level, we will have to grasp that everything depends on this: God’s revelation in Christ, in his Church, and in the saints―in the whole of Christian life―cannot and will not provide ready-made recipes for overcoming the problems of this world, of history, of the development of culture, the State, technology, and so on.  If this were so, man would be robbed of his deepest responsibility and freedom, and precisely the Christian, as compared to the non-Christian, would find himself at a frightful disadvantage that could never be compensated by the number of privileges.  The one and only thing God’s revelation does provide us with are archetypes or models that, necessarily and in keeping with their very essence stand above the level worldly questions and, like stars, shed their light down upon them.  If Christ himself wasted hardly a word concerning the State of culture, and no word at all concerning art or science, it was so as not to commit the blunder of meddling in the Father’s work of creation, and also in order not to rob man, the labouring king of creation, of the earnestness of his accomplishments by applying some magical formula.” ― Bernanos: An Ecclesial Existence, by Hans Urs Von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, ISBN 0-89870-576-2, Page 33.

  ““We did not make the choice.  ‘I am a Christian, revere me!’  This is what the Princes of the High Priests, the Scribes and the Pharisees love to proclaim.  What we should rather say and humbly, is: ‘I am a Christian, pray for me!’ We did not make the choice. . . . We find ourselves in this great adventure because God put us there.”” ― Bernanos: An Ecclesial Existence, by Hans Urs Von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, ISBN 0-89870-576-2, Page 35. 

“Walking such a path, you do not endear yourself to others, and you acquire the reputation of a malcontent and agitator: from the perspective of those who have chosen a tranquil middle course, you are the one “who walks on the edge”.  But does not the Christian have a right to freedom of speech and the duty to avail himself of this right?  “The Son of Man was betrayed by all of us.  But at least I hope I did not sell him.” ― Bernanos: An Ecclesial Existence, by Hans Urs Von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, ISBN 0-89870-576-2, Page 39. 

“Christians without a brain and poor priests without a conscience, scared at the idea that they will be treated like reactionaries, invite you to Christianize a world that, along with all its resources, is being deliberately and openly organized in such a way that it can do without Christ, that it can assure a justice without Christ, a justice without love, the same justice in whose name Love itself was scourged with rods and put on the cross.”   ― Bernanos: An Ecclesial Existence, by Hans Urs Von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, ISBN 0-89870-576-2, Page 42. 

“The one and only thing God’s revelation does provide us with are archetypes or models that, necessarily and in keeping with their very essence stand above the level of worldly questions and, like stars, shed their light down upon them.  If Christ himself wasted hardly a word concerning the State or culture, and no word at all concerning art or science, it was so as not to commit the blunder of meddling in the Father’s work of creation, and also in order not to rob man, the laboring king of creation, of the earnestness of his accomplishments by applying some magical formula.” ― Bernanos, an Ecclesial Existence, Hans Urs von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, LOC catalogue number 95-79888, Page 33.

“Sin has no depth―this he [Bernanos] would come to see clearly at the end of his life―because it “makes us live at the surface of ourselves.  We will again go back into ourselves only to die, and there is where he [Jesus Christ] awaits us.”” ― Bernanos, an Ecclesial Existence, Hans Urs von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, LOC catalogue number 95-79888, Page 153.

“But God becomes concrete for us in Christ, and it is to Christ as Redeemer that the whole authority to judge is entrusted.” ― Bernanos, an Ecclesial Existence, Hans Urs von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, LOC catalogue number 95-79888, Page 167.

“…reason’s ability to transcend itself along with existence constitutes Christian faith.  For Bernanos, faith is not a mere affirmation of propositions held to be true but a decision undertaken with one’s whole existence in response to Christ, on the basis of the fact that he has already transferred us out of the darkness and into the light.  Insofar as faith is such a decision, it is freedom itself and hence the motor force of reason.  “A man who reasons before believing, admiring, or loving, instead of reasoning only afterward, as if reason were what created faith, admiration, and love, while in reality it is made only to supervise them”: such a person is not “capable of foreseeing how, again this time, mankind is to be saved”.  For his reason is not creative, as it is at the culmination of the decision of faith; at  most it may be said to “register” an activity that dispenses with interior decision making and commitment and hence with the highest and most efficacious truth.  We here encounter for the first time the diagnosis of obedience that is so important to Bernanos, obedience being that noble Christian virtue that nowadays is so easily looked upon as the lowest of vices.  Whether addressing civil or ecclesiastical authorities, Bernanos cannot impress upon them enough the fact that “sabotaging this high and indispensable faculty of the soul called ‘judgment’ can only lead to great disasters. . . . People trained to obey blindly are the very ones who will suddenly disobey blindly.  To obey without discussion does not at all mean the same thing as to obey without understanding, and total docility is not as far as we think from total revolt.  Christian obedience, by its very nature, has a heroic character.” People who nowadays are the victims of propaganda are at the same time its secret accomplices: “They believe in everything for the same reason they believe in nothing.  If you went to the bottom of their apparent credulousness, you would find that it is only a form of the refusal to judge and that these people are suffering from a paralysis of their conscience.” ― Bernanos, an Ecclesial Existence, Hans Urs von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, LOC catalogue number 95-79888, Page 90.

“Bernanos’ endeavor was to show that Christ’s suffering is the a priori of all possible human suffering, because it infinitely surpasses and undergirds the suffering of any and all sinners.  “He suffered a kind of suffering about which we cannot have the faintest idea, a kind of suffering we have never experienced. . . .” ― Bernanos, an Ecclesial Existence, Hans Urs von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, LOC catalogue number 95-79888, Page 184.

 “For the deepest aspect of Christianity is God’s love for the earth.  Other religions also know that God is rich in his heaven.  What remained unheard of, unimaginable, until the coming of Jesus is that God should have wanted to be poor along with his creatures, that in his heaven he should have wanted to suffer because of his world and did in fact make that suffering a reality, that through his Incarnation he put himself in a position of demonstrating to his creatures this his suffering out of love.  And, if the suffering of man points only to that of the Son of Man behind him, then the Son through his suffering points to the wounded heart of the Father.  This is the final goal aimed at through all of Bernanos’ work.” ― Bernanos, an Ecclesial Existence, Hans Urs von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, LOC catalogue number 95-79888, Page 191.

“God yearns for his creature with a desire the least representation of which would reduce us to dust.  This is why he hid this desire in the deepest recesses of the gentle, suffering heart of Jesus Christ.” And here it becomes evident that from all eternity the content of God’s jealous zeal was his pathos―his passionate love―for his creatures [man].  This and this alone is what the crib and the Cross reveal.  This alone is what constitutes the scandal and the folly of Christianity, “the masterful absurdity, and the sublime challenge of this small number of thinking animals whose contribution, when all is said and done, is to have brought to the world the good news of Pain divinized.”  For this very reason, we repeat, resignation is not possible within Christianity.”  ― Bernanos, an Ecclesial Existence, Hans Urs von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, LOC catalogue number 95-79888, Page 192.

 “To be a Christian can be nothing other than to accept from grace, in union with Christ, the responsibility for the non-Christian world.” ― Bernanos, an Ecclesial Existence, Hans Urs von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, LOC catalogue number 95-79888, Page 253.

“…Bernanos was not interested in the sin of the flesh as autonomous theme, and he devoted to it about as much energy as did Christ and the apostles.  Seen in the correct Christian light, carnal sin amounts to pure and simple boredom: by no means could it be considered an “abyss of evil”.” ― Bernanos, an Ecclesial Existence, Hans Urs von Balthasar, A Communio Book, © 1996 Ignatius Press, San Francisco, LOC catalogue number 95-79888, Page 296.

“Ireland is unique in religious history for being the only land into which Christianity was introduced without bloodshed.” ― How the Irish Saved Civilization, Copyright © 1995 by Thomas Cahill, Nan A. Talese, an Imprint of Doubleday (a Division of Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc.), Page 151. ― One book from The Hinges Of History Series by Thomas Cahill.

“Christianity is about devotion, the love of God, folk ritual is about control, manipulation.” ― from A Secular Age, Copyright © 2007 by Charles Taylor, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London, England, 2007, Page 439.

“…the generations which have been formed in the cultural revolution of the 1960s are in some respects deeply alienated from a strong traditional model of Christian faith in the West.” ― from A Secular Age, Copyright © 2007 by Charles Taylor, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London, England, 2007, Page 495.

“(Morality was invented by sickly people. Christian life was invented by Jesus Christ.)” ― from A Secular Age, Copyright © 2007 by Charles Taylor, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London, England, 2007, Page 750.

“…early in the eighteenth century, groups of Quakers and evangelical Christians in America began the first organized campaigns against slavery.” ─ Life After Death, The Evidence, Copyright © 2009 by Dinesh D’Souza, Regnery Publishing, Washington DC, Page 198.

“…Christ offers a solution. In contrast with the difficulty of our situation, the solution is breathtakingly simple. It turns out that we don’t have to scale the high moral bar. We are not being asked to do the impossible. Rather, Christ wants us to acknowledge that we are sinners and to accept God’s grace by way of his sacrifice on the cross. There is a penalty for sin, we are told, but Christ has already paid it. In other words, the one who came back from the dead has cleared the way for the rest of us to enjoy eternal happiness. Therefore our job is almost embarrassingly easy: a guilty plea is all that is required for us to obtain an acquittal. Is this an excuse to avoid moral responsibility? Not at all. In accepting Christ’s sacrifice we repent of our misdeeds and seek to emulate his example in seeking purity of heart. We may never fully achieve this goal in the present life, but it at least supplies a standard to aspire to now, and one that will be realized in the life to come.” ─ Life After Death, The Evidence, Copyright © 2009 by Dinesh D’Souza, Regnery Publishing, Washington DC, Page 229.

 “Who can say no to such an offer? Alas, there are some who will. This is not because they seek eternal misery. Rather, they refuse to go Christ’s way because they insist on going their own way. There motto is that of Milton’s Satan, “Better to reign in hell rather than serve in heaven.” Their destiny is determined by their own decision. They choose to reject heaven, and God acquiesces in their choice. As C.S. Lewis writes in The Great Divorce, there are two kinds of people in the end, those who willingly say to God, “Thy will be done,” and the kind to whom God reluctantly says, “Thy will be done.”” ─ Life After Death, The Evidence, Copyright © 2009 by Dinesh D’Souza, Regnery Publishing, Washington DC, Page 229.

“Mencken was marginalized, but George Bernard Shaw, his frequent ally in subjects and sensibility, and long an icon for American liberals, remained influential. Over the years, Mencken and Shaw often ended up on the same side of conflicts. Both were contemptuous democracy, American culture, and Christian civilization, and both had a soft spot for the Kaiser and Hitler. Shaw had a soft spot as well for Mussolini and even wrote speeches for the would-be British Mussolini, Oswald Mosley.  The worst Mencken could say of Hitler was that the German reminded him of a “vulgar Klansman.” But Shaw as also enamored of Stalin, and it was there that the two men differed.” The Revolt Against the Masses, copyright © 2013 by Fred Siegel, Encounter Books, Page 79.

“The ancient Christians were animated by a contempt for their present existence, and by a just confidence of immortality, of which the doubtful and imperfect faith of modern [present] ages cannot give us any adequate notion.” ― The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Edward Gibbon, Volume I, 180 A. D. ― 395 A. D., Page 402, The Modern Library, New York, Random House.

“During a long period, from the death of Christ to that memorable rebellion [70 A.D.], we cannot discover any traces of Roman intolerance, unless they are to be found in the sudden, the transient, but the cruel persecution, which was exercised by Nero against the Christians of the capital, thirty-five years after the former, and only two years before the latter, of those great events.”

“The monks of succeeding ages, who, in their peaceful solitudes, entertained themselves with diversifying the deaths and sufferings of the martyrs, have frequently invented torment of a much more refined and ingenious nature [than were fact].” ― The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Edward Gibbon, Volume I, 180 A. D. ― 395 A. D., Page 467, The Modern Library, New York, Random House.

 “By a singular fatality (that of Marcus Antoninus], the hardships which they [Christians] had endured under the government of a virtuous prince immediately ceased on the accession of a tyrant; and as none except themselves had experienced the injustice of Marcus, so they were alone protected by the lenity of Commodus.  They celebrate Marcia, the most favoured of his concubines, and who at length contrived the murder of her Imperial lover, entertained a singular affection for the oppressed church; and though it was impossible that she could reconcile the practice of vice with precepts of the Gospel, she might hope to atone for the frailties of her sex and profession by declaring herself the patroness of the Christians.” ― The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Edward Gibbon, Volume I, 180 A. D. ― 395 A. D., Page 478, The Modern Library, New York, Random House.

“Forty years before the birth of Christ, the Mantuan bard [Virgil], as if inspired by the celestial muse of Isaiah, had celebrated, with all the pomp or oriental metaphor, the return of the Virgin, the fall of the serpent, the approaching birth of a godlike child, the offspring of the great Jupiter, who should expiate the guilt of humankind and govern the peaceful universe with the virtues of his father; the rise and appearance of an heavenly race, a primitive nation throughout the world; and the gradual restoration of the innocence and felicity of the golden age.  The poet was perhaps unconscious of the secret sense and object of these predictions, which have been so unworthily applied to the infant son of a consul, or a triumvir: but if a more splendid, and indeed specious, interpretation of the fourth eclogue contributed to the conversion of the first Christian emperor, Virgil may deserve to be ranked among the most successful missionaries of the Gospel.” ― The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Edward Gibbon, Volume I, 180 A. D. ― 395 A. D., Page 652, The Modern Library, New York, Random House.

 “The consubstantiality of the Father and the Son was established by the council of Nice, and has been unanimously received as a fundamental article of the Christian faith by the consent of the Greek, the Latin, the Oriental, and Protestant churches.”  ― The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Edward Gibbon, Volume I, 180 A. D. ― 395 A. D., Page 686, The Modern Library, New York, Random House.

 “Christianity, which opened the gates of Heaven to the barbarians, introduced an important change in their morals and political condition.  They received, at the same time, the use of letters, so essential to a religion whose doctrines are contained in a sacred book; and while they studied the divine truth, their minds were insensibly enlarged by the distant view of history, of nature, of the arts, and of society.  The version of the Scriptures into their native tongue, which had facilitated their conversion, must excite, among their clergy, some curiosity to read the original text, to understand the sacred liturgy of the church, and to examine, in the writing of the fathers, the chain of ecclesiastical tradition.  These spiritual gifts were preserved in the Greek and Latin languages, which concealed the inestimable monuments of ancient learning.  The immortal productions of Virgil, Cicero, and Livy, which were accessible to the Christian barbarians, maintained a silent intercourse between the reign of Augustus and the times of Clovis and Charlemagne.  The emulation of mankind was encouraged by the remembrance of a more perfect state; and the flame of science was secretly kept alive, to warm and enlighten the mature age of the Western world.” ― The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Edward Gibbon, Volume II, 395 A. D. ― 1185 A. D., Page 367, The Modern Library, New York, Random House.

“From the Christian perspective, the tension between time and eternity threatens life with meaninglessness.  History may reach its end before reaching its fulfillment.  Men cannot solve the most fundamental problem of human existence in history, and all attempts to do so have brought disaster in their wake.  Yet, as Marc Bloch pointed out, “Christianity is a religion of historians. . . .  The destiny of humankind, placed between the Fall and the Judgment, appears to its eyes as a long adventure, of which each life, each individual pilgrimage, is in its turn a reflection.  It is in time, and therefore, in history that the great drama of Sin and Redemption, the central axis of all Christian thought, is unfolded.”  According to Christian theology, God partially and episodically reveals Himself in history through Christ.  For this reason, Lukacs states that the incarnation, “the coming of Christ to this earth may have been? no, . . . it was, the central event of the universe; . . . the greatest, the most consequential event in the entire universe has occurred here, on this earth.”  Unlike its Eastern counterpart, Western Christianity, while hardly neglecting the divinity of Christ, has accentuated his humanity.  Lukacs observes, for example, that among Eastern Orthodox Christians, Easter, which celebrates the divinity of Christ, is a far more elaborate and solemn holiday than Christmas.  Of greater moment to Western Christians, Protestant and Catholic alike, is the day on which Christ entered the world and history as a human being.”  ― Remembered Past; On History, Historians, and Historical Knowledge, by John Lukacs, Page xvii, Preface, edited by Mark G. Malvasi and Jeffrey O. Nelson, ISI Books, Wilmington, Delaware, © 2005 ISI Books.

“Justice is of a lower order than is truth, and untruth is lower than is injustice.  The administration of justice, even with the best intentions of correcting injustice, may often have to ignore or overlook untruths during the judicial process.  We live and are capable of living with many injustices, with many shortcomings of justice; but what is a deeper and moral shortcoming is a self-willed choice to live with untruths.  (All of the parables of Christ taught us to believe in truth, not in justice.)” ― Remembered Past; On History, Historians, and Historical Knowledge, by John Lukacs, Chapter I, Page 16, edited by Mark G. Malvasi and Jeffrey O. Nelson, ISI Books, Wilmington, Delaware, © 2005 ISI Books.

 [From a George Kennan speech at the University of Notre Dame in 1953] “Remember that the ultimate judgments of good and evil are not ours to make: that the wrath of man against his fellow man must always be tempered by the recollection of his weakness and fallibility and by the example of forgiveness and redemption which is the essence of his Christian heritage.”] George Kennan, A Study of Character, Copyright © 2007 by John Lukacs, Yale University Press ♦ New Haven and London, Quote placed by Dr. Lukacs on Page 130.

 “Nietzsche…emphatically rejects the idea that we can dispense with Christian moral rules while keeping the remaining infrastructure of Christian morality substantially intact. Get rid of God and life after death, he argues, and you must also give up the ideas of equality, human dignity, democracy, human rights, and even peace and compassion. All of these, he notes, are imports from the age of transcendence, what Nietzsche terms “shadows of God,” and none of them can long survive without the assumptions that made them tenable. The only way to go beyond God and the afterlife is to have a revaluation of values and eventually to produce a new type of human being, a kind of “overman” who is, in Nietzsche’s terms, “beyond good and evil.” But this, Nietzsche recognizes, is a very precarious and hair-raising project. Nietzsche predicts that the death of transcendence will produce a terrible moral crisis, a dissolution of ideals to the point of nihilism. In the twentieth century, he says, “we shall have upheavals… and wars the like of which have never yet been seen on earth.” Nietzsche’s analysis is rendered more plausible by the fact that it has proved so prophetic.”  ─ Life After Death, The Evidence, Copyright © 2009 by Dinesh D’Souza, Regnery Publishing, Washington DC, Page 208.

 “…Christianity, as indeed Judaism, is rooted in history; its claims, at least in part, are historical, whereas the claims of most Oriental religions are mythological; and it is the emphasis on the historical Christ which is historically sensed in the consciousness of Western peoples while it is underplayed in the Eastern Christian folkish-religious traditions.  The conflict between religiosity and rationality in Europe developed relatively late,” as Otto Brunner put it, “and even in the Church, in its constitution, in its concepts of its rights, in its scholastic philosophy there have been peculiarly European and rational tendencies that are missing in other places.”  A fundamental factor in this kind of Western rationalism was the prevalence of historical thinking.”

Unless we understand this condition, and unless our Asian brethren understand that the progress of civilization (which, by now, is a progress of a kind of “Westernization”) is not merely the dissemination of tools and of skills, there is, I believe, enormous chaos ahead of all of us―the symptoms of which, already apparent here and there, are the usual ones of a blind and unwitting relapse into intellectual primitivism.  This is the primitivism of those who do not see that determinism and fatalism are far from being antitheses, that the most “advanced” and “exciting” American social philosophers of a Computer Civilization proceed from assumptions regarding human nature that are fundamentally akin to the assumptions of the most primitive and barbaric Oriental religions: for scientism and fideism―these opposites of idealism and realism―a kind of belief in mechanical abstractions and a kind of belief in certain dogmas, are not at all such opposite inclinations as they might seem at first sight.”  ― Historical Consciousness, Copyright © 1968 by John Lukacs, Harper & Row, Publishers, Page 27.

 “The earthly consequences as well as the very existence of Christ have been historical events.  The earthly consequences of His life turned out to be more important than those of his contemporary Augustus Caesar.  On this point historians and Christians are in accord.  There is, moreover, another potential point of accord between them.  For both the universe is geocentric as well as anthropocentric, the earth being the center of the historical as well as of the Christian universe―for the historian because man, the subject of his study, lives on this earth, and also because all of the different views of the universe have been the products of the mind of man, formulated from this earth; for the Christian because the Son of God appeared in no other but human form, and on no other planet but this.  A non-Christian historian is of course not compelled to believe this.  Yet it is not only because of the accepted convenience of the Christian calendar but because of the historicity of Christianity that the appearance of Jesus Christ within history marks, at least for most of us in the West, the most important division of historical time.” ― Historical Consciousness, Copyright © 1968 by John Lukacs, Harper & Row, Publishers, Page 223.

“…a Christian and a historical understanding of human nature may very well complement each other―especially now when our world is suffering from a decay of love, a condition which is obscured by the grim preoccupation with sex, and obfuscated by an increase of bureaucratic welfare and of legalistic tolerance, with the corresponding decline in human sensitivities.  In this sense we are already living in a world where unassuming love, again, becomes, curiously and existentially, practical.” ― Historical Consciousness, Copyright © 1968 by John Lukacs, Harper & Row, Publishers, footnote 26, Page 269.

 “(While in 1955 an afterglow of the neo-humanistic and Christian-democratic intellectual atmosphere that had followed World War II still illuminated the speculations of theorists of history in the Western world, by the early Sixties―especially in the English-speaking countries―this has given way to a confused vogue of neo-positivism and neo-Marxism, amounting to little more than to artificially sophisticated reformulations of the, in reality, antiquated and corroded categories of social scientism, a development confirming, alas, General de Gaulle’s political assertions to the effect that the English Channel is still at least as wide as the Atlantic Ocean.)  The broader and more widespread aspects of intellectual endeavor, too, have been marked by alarming symptoms of dissolution, including that of the Anglo-Saxon traditions of common sense and of the English language, the preoccupation with its guardianship having been abandoned by most intellectuals for more advantageous occupations.  (“It will never be known, wrote Péguy in Notre Patrie, “what acts of cowardice have been motivated by the fear of not looking sufficiently progressive.”)” ― Historical Consciousness, Copyright © 1968 by John Lukacs, Harper & Row, Publishers, Page 319.

“No matter how hard I shake my Kaleidoscope, I cannot see what he [Henry Osborn Taylor] saw.  One reason is that my approach is more catholic than his.  I share his conviction that “a realization of the power and import of the Christian Faith is needed for an understanding of the thoughts and feelings moving the men and women of the Middle Ages, and for a just appreciation of their aspirations and ideals,” but I do not see how that can be achieved without a careful study of brutality, ignorance, and delusions in the Middle Ages, not just among the laity, but also at the highest Christian altars.  Christianity survived despite medieval Christians, not because of them.  Fail to grasp that, and you will never understand their millennium.” ― A World Lit Only by Fire, The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance, Copyright © 1992 by William Manchester, Little Brown, Page XVII.

“Although they called themselves Christians, medieval Europeans were ignorant of the Gospels.  The Bible existed only in a language they could not read.  The mumbled incantations at Mass were meaningless to them.  They believed in sorcery, witchcraft, hobgoblins, werewolves, amulets, and black magic, and were thus indistinguishable from pagans.”  ― A World Lit Only by Fire, The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance, Copyright © 1992 by William Manchester, Little Brown, Page 60.

“…there had been little science and no modern civilization in the Dark Ages, when acceptance of papal supremacy by all Christendom had rescued a continent from chaos.  Faith had literally held Europe together then, giving hope to men who had been without it.” ― A World Lit Only by Fire, The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance, Copyright © 1992 by William Manchester, Little Brown, Page 117.

“For Christ is the end of the law, that everyone who has faith may be justified.” ― Romans 10:4, The Holy Bible, Revised Standard Edition, Thomas Nelson & Sons, New York, Revised A. D. 1952.

 “Christianity originated in the Near East, and during the first few centuries it had its greatest centers, its most prestigious churches and monasteries, in Syria, Palestine, and Mesopotamia. Early Eastern Christians wrote and thought in Syriac, a language closely related to the Aramaic of Jesus and his apostles.” ̶ The Lost History of Christianity, THE THOUSAND YEAR GOLDEN AGE of the Church in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia ̶and How it Died, Copyright ©2008 by John P. Jenkins, HarperCollins, NY, NY, Page ix.

“Any history of Christianity that fails to pay due attention to these Jacobites[iii] and Nestorians[iv] is missing a very large part of the story.” ̶ The Lost History of Christianity, THE THOUSAND YEAR GOLDEN AGE of the Church in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia ̶and How it Died, Copyright ©2008 by John P. Jenkins, HarperCollins, NY, NY, Page xi.

“During the latter Middle Ages, mass defections and persecutions across Asia and the Middle East uprooted what were then some of the world’s most numerous Christian communities, churches that possessed a vibrant lineal and cultural connection to the earliest Jesus movement of Syria and Palestine. Seventeenth century Japan thoroughly eliminated a Christian presence that had come close to a real force in the country, possibly even to achieving national conversion. Repeatedly through its history, the church’s tree has been pruned and cut back, often savagely.” ̶ The Lost History of Christianity, THE THOUSAND YEAR GOLDEN AGE of the Church in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia ̶and How it Died, Copyright ©2008 by John P. Jenkins, Page 3.



 [i] Last Rites, Copyright ©2009 by John Lukacs, Yale University Press, New Haven & London, Page 35.

[ii] Remembered Past; On History, Historians, and Historical Knowledge, by John Lukacs, Chapter I, Page 134, edited by Mark G. Malvasi and Jeffrey O. Nelson, ISI Books, Wilmington, Delaware, © 2005 ISI Books.

[iii] “In the sixth century, a Syrian leader named Jacobus Baradaeus organized the Monophysites into an underground parallel church that became known as the Jacobites. By the time of the Arab conquests in the seventh century, the Jacobites probably held the loyalty of most Christians in greater Syria, while the Nestorians dominated the eastern lands, in what we now call Iraq and Iran. The West Syrian church was Jacobite; East Syrians were Nestorian.” (Page x).

[iv] Named thus for Patriarch Nestorius, who accepted the two natures [of Christ] but held that these were not absolutely united in the mystical sense taught by the Orthodox [Catholic Church in Rome]. (Page x).

Suggestions

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  49. Polybius, The Histories, Volume V, Loeb Classical Library, edited by Jeffrey Henderson with editor emeritus G.P. Goold, translated by W. R. Paton, 523 Pages (½Greek, ½English).
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  57. Philo (of Alexandria, Egypt) III, Loeb Classical Library, translated by F. H. Colson and G.H. Whitaker, 512 Pages (½Greek, ½English).
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  84. The Bottomless Well, Peter W. Huber & Mark P. Mills, 214 Pages.
  85. American Caesar, William Manchester, 793 Pages.
  86. The Holy Qur’an, 725 Pages.
  87. The Dark Side of Islam, by R.C. Sproul and Adbul Saleeb, 107 Pages.
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  92. Franklin and Winston, Jon Meacham, 490 Pages.
  93. History of Rome, Titus Livius (Livy) III, Books 5-7, (½Latin, ½English) 527 Pages.
  94. History of Rome, Titus Livius (Livy) IV, Books 8-10, (½Latin, ½English) 570 Pages.
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  97. History of Rome, Titus Livius (Livy) VII, Books 26-27, (½Latin, ½English) 424 Pages.
  98. History of Rome, Titus Livius (Livy) VIII, Books 28-30, (½Latin, ½English) 554 Pages.
  99. History of Rome, Titus Livius (Livy) IX, Books 31-34, (½Latin, ½English) 594 Pages.
  100. History of Rome, Titus Livius (Livy) X, Books 35-37, (½Latin, ½English) 491 Pages
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  102. History of Rome, Titus Livius (Livy) XII, Books 40-42, (½Latin, ½English) 521 Pages.
  103. History of Rome, Titus Livius (Livy) XIII, Books 43-45, (½Latin, ½English) 425 Pages.
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  108. Letters and Panegyricus, Pliny The Younger, Books VIII-X (½Latin, ½English) 586 Pages.
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  110. Remembrance of Things Past, Volume II, Marcel Proust, 1197 Pages.
  111. Remembrance of Things Past, Volume III, Marcel Proust, 1107 Pages.
  112. State of Fear, Michael Crichton, 607 Pages.
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  123. Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World, Jack Weatherford, 271 Pages.
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  133. Memorabilia Oeconomicus Symposium · Apology, Xenephon, 663 Pages (½Greek, ½English).
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  135. Cyropaedia, Xenophon, Books V-VIII, 439 Pages* (½Greek, ½English).
  136. Greek Iambic Poetry, Douglas A. Gerber, Translator, From the Seventh to The Fifth Centuries BC, The Loeb Classical Library 551 Pages (½Greek, ½English).
  137. Scirpta Minora, Pseudo-Xenophon, Constitution of the Athenians, Xenophon, 507 Pages (½Greek, ½English).
  138. Andrew Jackson, His Life and Times, H. W. Brands, 620 Pages.
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  143. A History of Egypt, The Ptolemaic Dynasty, by Edwyn Bevan, Methuen & Co. Ltd, 36 Essex Street W.C., London, 1927, 384 Pages.
  144. Astronomica, by Manilius, The Loeb Classical Library (LCL 469), Edited by Jeffrey Henderson, 363 Pages.
  145. At The End Of An Age, John Lukacs, 225 Pages.
  146. Remembered Past, on History, Historians, and Historical Knowledge, John Lukacs, 923 Pages.
  147. Virgil, Eclogues, Georgics, Aeneid 1-6, by Publius Vergilius Maro, 507 Pages (½Greek, ½English).
  148. The Hitler of History, John Lukacs, 268 Pages, Vintage Books, Division of Random House, Inc.
  149. Virgil, Aeneid 7-12, Appendix Vergiliana (LCL 64), by Publius Vergilius Maro, 527 Pages (½Greek, ½English).
  150. Budapest 1900, © 1988 by John Lukacs, Weidenfeld & Nicholson, New York, 225 Pages.
  151. Herodotus, Volume I, edited by Jeffrey Henderson, Loeb Classical Library (117), Books I-II (½Greek, ½English), 497 Pages.
  152. Herodotus, Volume II, edited by Jeffrey Henderson, Loeb Classical Library (118), Books III-IV (½Greek, ½English), 407 Pages.
  153. Herodotus, Volume III, edited by Jeffrey Henderson, Loeb Classical Library (119), Books V-VII (½Greek, ½English), 557 Pages.
  154. Herodotus, Volume IV, edited by Jeffrey Henderson, Loeb Classical Library (120), Books VIII-IX (½Greek, ½English), 301 Pages.
  155. Blood, Toil, Tears and Sweat, The Dire Warning, Basic Books, A Member of the Perseus Books Group, New York, Copyright © 2008 by John Lukacs, 147 Pages.
  156. June 1941, Hitler and Stalin, Yale University Press, New Haven and London, Copyright © 2006 by John Lukacs, 169 Pages.
  157. Cicero I, Rhetorica ad Herennium, edited by Jeffrey Henderson, (½Latin, ½English) Loeb Classical Library (LCL 403), 411 Pages.
  158. Cicero II, De Inventione, De Optimo Genere Oratorum – Topica, edited by Jeffrey Henderson, (½Latin, ½English) Loeb Classical Library (LCL 386), 459 Pages.
  159. His Excellency, Copyright © 2004 by Joseph J. Ellis, published by Alfred A. Knopf, IN PROGRESS.
  160. Cicero III, On The Orator, Books 1-2, (LCL 348), Edited by Jeffrey Henderson, (½Latin, ½English) ― English Translation by E. W. Sutton Completed, Introduction by H. Rackham, 1948, 480 Pages.
  161. A Thread Of Years, Copyright © 1998 by Yale University, by John Lukacs, 481 Pages.
  162. Cicero IV, De Oratore, Book III, De Fato Paradoxa Stoicorum, Partitione Oratoria with English translation by H. Rackhan, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 349), 421 Pages.
  163. His Excellency, by Joseph J. Ellis, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 2004, 275 Pages.
  164. Cicero V, Brutus, Orator, Book V, with English translation by G. L. Hendrickson and H. M. Hubbell consecutively, edited by Jeffrey Henderson Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 342), 509 Pages.
  165. George Kennan, , A Study of Character, Copyright © 2007 by John Lukacs, Yale University Press ♦ New Haven and London, 207 Pages.
  166. Byzantium, The Early Centuries, by John Julius Norwich, Copyright © 1988 by John Julius Norwich, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 2007, 387 Pages.
  167. Cicero, Pro Publio Quinctio, Pro Sexto Roscio Amerino, Pro Quinto Rosico Comoedo, De Lege Agraria, (LCL 240), Edited by Jeffrey Henderson, (½Latin, ½English), 500 Pages.
  168. Byzantium, The Apogee, by John Julius Norwich, Copyright © 1991 by John Julius Norwich, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 2007, 362 Pages.
  169. Cicero, The Verrine Orations, Volume I, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 221), Edited by Jeffrey Henderson, (½Latin, ½English), 499 Pages.
  170. Byzantium, The Decline and Fall, by John Julius Norwich, Copyright © 1995 by John Julius Norwich, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 2006, 454 Pages.
  171. Cicero, The Verrine Orations, Volume II, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 293), Edited by Jeffrey Henderson, (½Latin, ½English), 679 Pages.
  172. The Reckless Decade, Copyright © 1995 by H. W. Brands, the University of Chicago Press-Chicago and London, 351 Pages.
  173. The End of Time, Copyright © 1995 by David Horowitz, Encounter Books, San Francisco, 155 Pages.
  174. Deconstructing the Left, Copyright © 1995 by the Center for the Study of Popular Culture, Los Angeles, CA, 236 Pages.
  175. Yakuza, Japan’s Criminal Underworld, by David E, Kaplan and Alec Dubro, Copyright © 2003 by the Center for Investigative Reporting and David E. Kaplan, University of California Press, Berkley and Los Angeles, California; University of California Press, Ltd., London, England, 337 Pages.
  176. Confessions of an Original Sinner, Copyright © 1990 by John Lukacs, St. Augustine’s Press, South Bend, Indiana, 328 Pages.
  177. Last Rites, Copyright © 2009 by John Lukacs, Yale University Press – New Haven & London, 187 Pages.
  178. Blaise Pascal, Pensées, Copyright © 2005 by Hackett Publishing Company, Inc., IN PROGRESS.
  179. Democracy in America (Complete), by Alexis de Toqueville, The Echo Library 2007, The Echo Library, 131 High St., Teddington, Middlesex TW11 8HH ♦ Breinigsville, PA USA 04 November 2009 227000BV00003B/21/A, constantly referenced.
  180. Cicero IX, Pro Lege Manilia; Pro Caecina; Pro Cluentio; Pro Rabirio Perduellione, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 198), Edited by Jeffrey Henderson, (½Latin, ½English).
  181. Atlas Shrugged, Copyright © Ayn Rand, 1957. Copyright renewed 1985 by Eugene Winick, Paul Gitlin and Leonard Peikoff – Introduction Copyright © 1992 by Leonard Peikoff ― DUTTON, Published by Penguin Group (USA) inc,, 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, U.S.A. ― 1168 Pages.
  182. God is not Great, How Religion Poisons Everything, Copyright © 2007 by Christopher Hitchens ― Twelve-Hachette Book Group USA, 237 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10017, IN PROGRESS.
  183. CICERO IX, Pro Lege Manilia, Pro Caecina, Pro Cluentio, Pro Rabirio Perduellionis, with English translation by H. Grose Hodge, edited by Jeffrey Henderson Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 198), 496 Pages.
  184. CICERO X, In Catilinum I-IV, Pro Murena, Pro Sulla, Pro Flacco, with English translation by C. Macdonald, edited by Jeffrey Henderson Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 324), 596 Pages.
  185. Tintin in the Congo (The Adventures of Tintin), by Hergé, © 1962 by Casterman, Bruxelles, ISBN 2-203-79701-0.
  186. With Wings Like Eagles, The Untold Story of The Battle of Britain, © 2009 by Success Research Corporation, HarperCollins Publishers, 322 Pages.
  187. The Complete Essays of Montaigne, translated by Donald M. Frame, Stanford University Press, Stanford, California; Copyright 1943 by Donald M. Frame, renewed 1971. Copyright © 1948, 1957, and 1958 by the Board of Trustees or the Leland Stanford Junior University – Original Edition 1958, 883 Pages.
  188. The Man Who Loved China, Copyright © 2008 by Simon Winchester, Published by Harper Collins, IN 316 Pages.
  189. Yakuza Moon, Copyright © 2004 by Shoko Tendo, published by Kodansha International, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan, 187 Pages.
  190. Pierre Duhem, Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science, translated and edited, with introduction by Roger Ariew and Peter Barker, Hackett Publishing Company, Indianapolis and Cambridge, Copyright © 1996 by Hackett Publishing Company, Incorporated, 290 Pages.
  191. Atlantic, Copyright © 2010 by Simon Winchester, Harper, ISBN 978-0-06-170258-7, 495 Pages.
  192. Remains of Old Latin, Ennius and Caecilius, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 294), Volume I, edited by Jeffrey Henderson Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, 597 Pages of text (and more in references/indices).
  193. Remains of Old Latin; Livius Andronicus, Naevius, Pacuvius, Accius, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 314), Volume II, edited by Jeffrey Henderson, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, 673 Pages.
  194. Remains of Old Latin; Lucilius, Twelve Tables, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 329), Volume III, edited by Jeffrey Henderson, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, 549 Pages.
  195. Remains of Old Latin; Archaic Inscriptions, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 359), Volume IV, edited by Jeffrey Henderson, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, 487 Pages.
  196. Dealing with Demons, Coping with Mental Illness, A Love Story, Copyright © 2010 by Peter Michael Solstad, Mare Pacificum, Ewa Beach HI, 242 Pages.
  197. Undaunted Courage, Copyright © 1996 by Ambrose and Tubbs, Inc., Simon & Shuster Paperbacks, 673 Pages.
  198. Marcus Aurelius, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 58), edited by Jeffrey Henderson, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, (½Latin, ½English), 416 Pages.
  199. Historical Consciousness, or the remembered past, © 1968 by John Lukacs, Harper & Row Publishers, New York, Evanston, and London, 373 Pages.
  200. Homo Ludens, A Study of the Play-Element in Culture, Copyright © 1949 J. Huizinga, Routledge-Taylor & Francis Group, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 4Rn, 220 Pages.
  201. The River and the Gauntlet by S.L.A. Marshall, © by S.L.A. Marshall, The Battery Press, Inc., Nashville, Tennessee, 307 Pages.
  202. LEVANT, Copyright © 2010 by Philip Mansel, Yale University Press, 470 Pages.
  203. BERNANOS, An Ecclesial Existence, Copyright © 1988 Johannes-Verlag, Einsiedeln, Trier, A Communio Book, Ignatius Press, San Francisco, 617 Pages.
  204. Suetonius, Volume I, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 31), edited by G. P. Goold, HarvardHarvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, (½Latin, ½English), 507 Pages.
  205. Suetonius, Volume II, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 38), edited by G. P. Goold, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, (½Latin, ½English), 548 Pages.
  206. The Apostolic Fathers, Volume I, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 24), edited and translated by Bart D. Ehrman, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, (½Greek, ½English), 443 Pages.
  207. The Apostolic Fathers, Volume II, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 24), edited and translated by Bart D. Ehrman, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, (½Greek, ½English), 481 Pages.
  208. Handbook on The Wisdom Books and Psalms, by Daniel J. Estes, Baker Academic, Grand Rapid, Michigan, Copyright © 2005 by Daniel J. Estes, 448 Pages.
  209. Horace, Odes, Epodes, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 33), Copyright © 2004 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College, edited and translated by Niall Rudd, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, (½Latin, ½English), 350 Pages.
  210. Horace, Satires, Epistles, and Poetica, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 194), edited and translated by Jeffrey Henderson, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, (½Latin, ½English), 509 Pages.
  211. Lucretius, On the Nature of Things, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 181), edited by Jeffrey Henderson with an English Translation by W. H. D. Rouse and revised by Martin Ferguson Smith, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, (½Latin, ½English), 601 Pages.
  212. The Life of the White Ant, by Maurice Maeterlinck, Translated by Alfred Sutro, Copyright, 1927 By Dodd, Mead and Company, Inc., New York, 238 Pages.
  213. The Last Lion, Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965, By William Manchester and Paul Reid, 1182 Pages.
  214. Under Satan’s Sun (Sous le Soleil de Satan), by Georges Bernanos, Copyright © Librairie Plon, 1926, 1987, 1994 ─ Translation Copyright © 2001 by the University of Nebraska Press, Translated by J. C. Whitehouse, 257 Pages.
  215. Martin Chuzzlewit, by Charles Dickens, Published by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., Introduction Copyright © 1994 by William Boyd; Bibliography and Chronology Copyright © 1994 by David Campbell Publishers Ltd., First Included in Everyman’s Library, 1907, ISBN 0-679-43884-X, 851 Pages.
  216. Greek Lyric, Sappho-Alcaeus, Loeb Classical Library, (LCL 142), edited and translated by Jeffrey Henderson, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts ♦ London, England, Loeb Classical Library, (½Greek, ½English).
  217. The Annals of the World, by Reverend Archbishop Ussher (1580 – 1665), Copyright © 2003 by Larry and Marion Price, Master Books, Green Forest, Arkansas – In Progress.
  218. Once Upon a Lake, by Thelma Jones, Copyright © 1957 by Ross & Haines, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota 1969, 415 Pages.
  219. Life After Death, The Evidence, Copyright © 2009 by Dinesh, D’Souza, Regnery Publishing, Washington DC and distributed by Perseus Distribution, Mew York, NY, 269 Pages.
  220. India, a Portrait, Copyright © 2011 by Patrick French, Published in the United State by Alfred A. Knopf, 398 Pages.
  221. The Complete Terry and the Pirates 1934-1936, ® and © 2007 Tribune Media Services, Volume 1, by Milton Caniff, Second Printing ISBN: 978-1-60010-100-7, 2009, 367 Pages.
  222. The Complete Terry and the Pirates 1937-1938, ® and © 2007 Tribune Media Services, Volume 2, by Milton Caniff, Second Printing ISBN: 978-1-60010-142-7, 2009, 367 Pages.
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  225. A Short History of the Twentieth Century, Copyright © 2013 by John Lukacs, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, London, England, 230 Pages.
  226. Catalogue Raisonne As Memoir, Copyright © 2004 by Dominick Argento, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis / London, 230 Pages.
  227. Jesus, The Human Face of God, Copyright © 2013 by Jay Parini, published by special arrangement with Amazon Publishing, 170 Pages.
  228. An Army at Dawn, The War in North Africa, 1942-1943, Copyright © 2002 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, 681 Pages.
  229. The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, 791 Pages.
  230. The Guns at Last Light, The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945, Copyright © 2013 by Rick Atkinson, 877 Pages.
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  232. How (Not) to be Secular, Reading Charles Taylor, @ 2014 by James K.A. Smith, Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., Cambridge CB3 9PU U.K., 148 Pages.
  233. The Conceptual Evolution of DSM-5, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Copyright © 2011 American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc., Arlington, VA (appi.org) 359 Pages.
  234. DSM-5, Handbook of Differential Diagnosis, Copyright © 2014, American Psychiatric Association, American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc., Arlington, VA (appi.org) 322 Pages.
  235. No Crueler Tyrannies, Accusation, False Witness, and Other Terrors of Our Times, Copyright © by Dorothy Rabinowitz, Wall Street Journal Books, 239 Pages.
  236. The Egyptian, by Mika Waltari, Copyright © 1949, by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York, 503 Pages.
  237. A Secular Age, by Charles Taylor, Copyright © 2007 by Charles Taylor, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, and London, England – 2007, 874 Pages.
  238. A Student’s Guide to the Study of History, Copyright © 2000 Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Second Printing 2001, by John Lukacs, 49 Pages.
  239. How The Irish Saved Civilization, The Untold Story of Ireland’s Heroic Role from the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe, Copyright © 1995 by Thomas Cahill, published by Nan A. Talese, an Imprint of Doubleday (Division of Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc.) New York, NY, 246 Pages.
  240. Sailing the Wine Dark Sea, Why the Greeks Matter, Copyright © 2003 by Thomas Cahill, published by Nan A. Talese, an Imprint of Doubleday (Division of Random House, Inc.), 303 Pages.
  241. Simone Weil, Gravity and Grace, Copyright © 1947, 1949 Librairie PLON, Routledge, London and New York, 183 Pages.
  242. Shattered Consensus, The Rise and Decline of America’s Post War Political Order, Copyright © 2015 by James Piereson, Encounter Books, New York, NY, 389 Pages.
  243. The Good Earth, Copyright © 1931 by Pearl S. Buck, Washington Square Press, New York, NY, 357 Pages.
  244. Wanderer, Copyright © 1963, 1977 by Sterling Hayden, First published by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. then in 1977 by W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 434 Pages.
  245. Digital Barbarism, Copyright © 2009 by Mark Helprin, Harper Collins, 217 Pages (Brilliant).
  246. A Writer’s Diary, Virginia Woolf, edited by Leonard Woolf, Harcourt, Brace and Company, New York, Copyright © 1953, 1954 by Leonard Woolf, 356 Pages.
  247. Hubris, Copyright © 2015 by Alistair Horne, HarperCollins Publishers, New York, NY, 382 Pages.
  248. Snowball in a Blizzard, Copyright © 2016 by Steven Hatch, Basic Books, New York, 293 Pages.
  249. My Final Word, Copyright © 2015 by the Chuck Colson Center for Christian Worldview; Zondervan, 240 Pages.
  250. The End of the Experiment, The Rise of the Cultural Elites and the Decline of America’s Civil Culture, Stanley Rothman, Copyright © 2016 by Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick, New Jersey, 239 Pages.
  251. I Know Best, How Moral Narcissism is Destroying Our Republic, Copyright © 2016 by Roger L. Simon, Encounter Books, New York – London, 210 Pages.
  252. The Greatness of the Romans and Their Decline, Copyright © 1965 by The Free Press, Hackett Publishing Company, Indianapolis, 219 Pages.
  253. The Lost History of Christianity, The Thousand-Year Golden Age of the Church in the Middle Est, Africa, and Asia ̶ and How it Died, Copyright 2008 by John P. Jenkins, HarperCollins, NY, NY, 315 Pages.

 

 

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