Civilizational Decay – An Observation

Michael

An Observation: “Mainstream medicine objectifies the body and its processes, and what [Dr. Taylor calls] medicalization extends this objectification to vice.” This medicalization or therapeutic turn is used to mainstream gender dysphoria, which includes all mental disorders under the rubric LGBT, which legitimizes vice itself. Why not then legitimize and mainstream schizophrenia or pedophilia? [i] In fact, why not mainstream all mental disorders, at least those listed within DSM-5?

Mainstreaming mental disorders is a regression from civilization to barbarism.

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Dr. Charles Taylor,
Holder of the Templeton Prize

[i] A Secular Age, Copyright © 2007 by Charles Taylor, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts and London, England, 2007, Page 507.

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In View of the Recent Attacks in Egypt this is a re-post…

Winston Spencer Churchill

How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism [Islam] lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy. The effects, are apparent in many countries. Improvident habits, slovenly systems of agriculture, sluggish methods of commerce, and insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live. A degraded sensualism deprives this life of its grace and refinement; the next of its dignity and sanctity. The fact that in Mohammedan law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property—either as a child, a wife, or a concubine— must delay the final extinction of slavery until the faith of Islam has ceased to be a great power among men. Individual Moslems may show splendid qualities. Thousands become the brave and loyal soldiers of the Queen: all know how to die: but the influence of the religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith. It has already spread throughout Central Africa, raising fearless warriors at every step; and were it not that Christianity is sheltered in the strong arms of science—the science against which it had vainly struggled—the civilisation of modern Europe might fall, as fell the civilisation of ancient Rome. — The River War, Volume II, by Winston Spencer Churchill, Longman Greens and Co., 89 Paternoster Row, London, New York, and Bombay 1899, Page 248.

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Lest we forget…

American Battle Monuments Commission

In Flanders Fields
by John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you, from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow,
In Flanders fields.

Dr. McCrae

11th Month, 11th Day, 11th Hour: Armistice Day, 1918

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Islam: a historical judgement

The River War, Volume II, 1899 by Winston Spencer Churchill

How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy. The effects, are apparent in many countries. Improvident habits, slovenly systems of agriculture, sluggish methods of commerce, and insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live. A degraded sensualism deprives this life of its grace and refinement; the next of its dignity and sanctity. The fact that in Mohammedan law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property—either as a child, a wife, or a concubine— must delay the final extinction of slavery until the faith of Islam has ceased to be a great power among men. Individual Moslems may show splendid qualities. Thousands become the brave and loyal soldiers of the Queen: all know how to die: but the influence of the religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith. It has already spread throughout Central Africa, raising fearless warriors at every step; and were it not that Christianity is sheltered in the strong arms of science—the science against which it had vainly struggled—the civilisation of modern Europe might fall, as fell the civilisation of ancient Rome. — The River War, Volume II, by Winston Spencer Churchill, Longman Greens and Co., 89 Paternoster Row, London, New York, and Bombay 1899, Page 248.

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Winston Spencer Churchill

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Regarding the book I, Rigoberta Menchu…

“As the proverb tells us that a single drop from the largest vessel suffices to tell us the nature of the whole contents, so we should regard the subject now under discussion.  When we find one or two false statements in a book and they prove to be deliberate ones, it is evident that not a word written by such an author is any longer certain and reliable.” [i]

furthermore…

“For naturally the fact is that one makes falsehood more credible if one mixes a little truth with it…” [ii]

and so…

The story of Rigoberta Menchu, a Quiche [K’iche’] Mayan from Guatemala, whose autobiography catapulted her to international fame, won her the Nobel Peace Prize, and made her an international emblem of the dispossessed indigenous peoples of the Western hemisphere and their attempt to rebel against the oppression of European conquerors, has now been exposed as a political fabrication, a tissue of lies, and one of the greatest intellectual and academic hoaxes of the Twentieth Century. — David Horowitz

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I, Rogobert Menchu

[i] Polybius, The Histories, Volume IV, The Loeb Classical Library (LCL 138), Book XII, Page369, year 2000.

[ii] Polybius, The Histories, Volume VI, The Loeb Classical Library (LCL 161), Book XXXIV, Page299, year 2000.

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A Conjecture…

Stephen Hawking

“…if we do discover a complete theory, it would in time be understandable in broad principle by everyone, not just a few scientists. Then we shall all, philosophers, scientists, and just ordinary people, be able to take part in the discussion of the question of why it is that we and the universe exist. If we find the answer to that, it would be the ultimate triumph of human reason ̶ for then we would know the mind of God.” ̶ A Brief History of Time, Copyright © 1988, 1996 by Stephen Hawking, a Bantam Book, Page 191.

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On the pestilential habit of hastily attributing motives…

Often, old advice is the best advice, to wit: Judge not, that ye be not judged.  For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye? — Matthew 7:1-3, King James Version

Dr. John Lukacs, Historian

“Here is the essential difference between historical and legal evidence ― or between historical and legal thinking.  Law (at least in a state governed by a constitution) can deal only with actuality, not with potentiality.  “The law is a coarse net; and truth is a slippery fish.”  Yes, but the purpose of law has nothing to do with truth: it is the establishment of justice.  Truth and justice are not the same things, even though the pursuit of truth and the pursuit of justice may, on occasion, overlap.  But besides the question (or, rather, the obvious primacy) of truth over justice, there are other important differences between historical and legal evidences and thinking.  One is that law, after all ― inevitably and necessarily ― is a closed system, within its own definite rules and regulations.  For instance, it does not and should not allow multiple jeopardy: a case, when and if properly tried, is decided once and for all.  History (and our memory) is open and never closed; it specializes in multiple jeopardy: its subjects and people are rethought over and over again, and not even necessarily on the basis of newly found evidence. . . .  Another great difference ― I am again referring principally to Anglo-American law ― is the one between motives and purposes.  These two are regrettably confused because of the vocabulary and the practices of twentieth-century psychology and thought, the attribution of motive having become a pestilential habit [my italics].  But we must distinguish between the two.  Motives come from the past; purposes involve the pull of the future.  At its best, Anglo-American law will admit only a “motive” which has been, in one way or another, expressed; in other words, an actuality, not a potentiality.  (As Dr. Johnson said: “Intentions must be gathered from acts.”)  At its worst, unexpressed motives are sometime attributed and accepted in some courts on the basis of psychological characterization and other dubious “expertise.”  A proper comprehension of the essential difference between motives and purposes is an essential condition of the pursuit and of the protection of justice and of truth ― and of all historical thinking and speaking and writing.” ― Remembered Past; On History, Historians, and Historical Knowledge, by John Lukacs, Chapter I, Page 8, edited by Mark G. Malvasi and Jeffrey O. Nelson, ISI Books, Wilmington, Delaware, © 2005 ISI Books.

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