Monthly Archives: March 2011

Quotation of the Day

“In the purer ages of the commonwealth, the use of arms was reserved for those ranks of citizens who had a country to love, a property to defend, and some share in enacting those laws, which it was their interest, … Continue reading

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Quotation of the Day

“Bastiat believed that all human beings possessed the God-given, natural rights of “individuality, liberty, property.”  “This is man,” he wrote.  “These three gifts from God precede all human legislation.”  But even in his time―writing in the late 1840s―Bastiat was alarmed … Continue reading

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Quotation of the Day

“Is the human mind nothing but matter in motion?  Surprisingly, physics itself, a subject concerned only with matter and its properties, may tell us that the answer is no.  At least, this is the view of some modern physicists of … Continue reading

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Quotation of the Day

“Federal deposit insurance, it should be noted, didn’t stop bank failures.  Banks continued to fail.  Since depositors no longer worried about losing their money, though, there weren’t any more serious bank panics.  A major effect of deposit insurance was to … Continue reading

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Quotation of the Day

“…prudent thought is veiled anew [again and again] and disappears behind the clouds gathered by a superb and absolute confidence in the omnipotence of modern science.” ― Pierre Duhem, Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science, translated and edited, … Continue reading

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Quotation of the Day

“Politicians had always been good at giving away what belonged to other people, and they probably always would be.” From H. W. Brand’s The Reckless Decade, America in the 1890s, Copyright © 1995 by H. W. Brands, University of Chicago … Continue reading

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Quotation of the Day

“FDR tripled taxes during the Great Depression, from $1.6 billion in 1933 to $5.3 billion in 1940. Federal taxes as a percentage of the gross national product jumped from 3.5 percent in 1933 to 6.9 percent in 1940, and taxes … Continue reading

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