Understanding the Liberal Mythos of Divisiveness-The ‘Scopes Monkey Trial’

Fred Siegel's The Revolt Against the Masses

Fred Siegel’s The Revolt Against the Masses

“The case was a contrivance from the outset [the Scopes “Monkey Trial”]. The American Civil Liberties Union, founded in the wake of WWI’s repression, had initiated the case, which it saw as an opportunity to repeal the Butler Act while also making a name for itself. The ACLU ran newspaper ads across the state looking for a teacher who would be willing to cooperate with them in challenging the state law. They needed a defendant who would agree to be tried for violating the Butler Act. The town fathers of Dayton envisioned the trial as a potential boon that could put them on the map, and they convinced Scopes, a local high school teacher, to intentionally incriminate himself so that he would qualify as a defendant and the state’s case could go forward. His arrest was a friendly affair arranged by local boosters as a prelude to the show, which would make history by being the first trial broadcast on radio.” The Revolt Against the Masses, copyright © 2013 by Fred Siegel, Encounter Books, Page 55.

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“Regardless of what happened in Dayton, the effect of the case was clear: European-like divisions, largely absent thus far in America, opened up between science and revealed religion it was a chasm never to be closed.” The Revolt Against the Masses, copyright © 2013 by Fred Siegel, Encounter Books, Page 57.

About Michael

Retired military officer; retired Air Force civil servant; retired executive, DS Information Systems Corporation; writer; researcher; reader and avid yachtsman.
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