“Every evil is easily crushed at its birth; become inveterate it as a rule gathers strength.” — Cicero

Rick Atkinson's Liberation Trilogy, Winner of the Pulitzer Prize

Rick Atkinson’s Liberation Trilogy, Winner of the Pulitzer Prize

If we do not facedown Islamic Terrorism now it will continue to grow and there will be hell to pay. The Obama Administration is failing us in this regard, utterly, and placing our very lives on the line. Make no mistake about it. Consider what our ancestors had to deal with for their lack of preparation; their hesitation to confront evil: the cataclysm of WWII. For further perspective consider that the world population in 1939 was 2.25 billion souls. Today that number is vastly greater; 7.21 billion, which ought to magnify the horror we might still avoid.  We have no southern border. We have no leadership, and the Obama Administration is enfeebling our military.


This is what happened 75 years ago. It can happen again. If we continue on the road we are now on, it will and on a scale unimaginable:

“September 1, 1939, was the first day of a war that would claim an average 27,600 lives every day, or 1,150 an hour, or 19 a minute, or one death every 3 seconds.” An Army at Dawn, The War in North Africa, 1942-1943, Copyright © 2002 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 5.

“By war’s end the United States had sent its allies 37,000 tanks, 800,000 trucks, nearly 2 million rifles, and 43,000 planes ─ so many that U.S. pilot training was curtailed because of aircraft shortages.” An Army at Dawn, The War in North Africa, 1942-1943, Copyright © 2002 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 7.

“Forces in the Pacific would remain on the strategic defensive until European adversaries had been clubbed into submission.” An Army at Dawn, The War in North Africa, 1942-1943, Copyright © 2002 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 11.

“A single American 105mm howitzer firing at its maximum rate could lob 4,000 pounds of shells in an hour over a 43,000 square yard area; American gunners now massed more than 300 guns, spitting eleven tons of steel each minute.” An Army at Dawn, The War in North Africa, 1942-1943, Copyright © 2002 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 500.

 

Lieutenant Audie Leon Murphy

Lieutenant Audie Leon Murphy

“Private First Class Audie L. Murphy, not yet nineteen and weighing in at 110 pounds, would become the most decorated American combat soldier in history, but not even the appearance of his like would free most troops from compulsory service for the duration.” An Army at Dawn, The War in North Africa, 1942-1943, Copyright © 2002 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 535.

“The German submariner casualty rate during the war, 75 percent, would exceed that of every other service arm in every other nation.” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 5.

“Dead soldiers, German and American, were “covered with a carpet of maggots that made it look as though the corpses were alive and twitching.”” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 158.

“Any illusions that the enemy planned to quietly decamp should have been dispelled by a captured German paratrooper. Blinded by his wounds, he told his captors, “I wish I could see you. I’d kill every one of you.” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 304.

“As the Americans began to pull back a few miles to recuperate, a German courier bearing a white flag proposed a brief truce of February 14 to collect the dead near Cairo. Soon German soldiers fashioned litters from saplings and shelter halves; an American detail delivered 150 enemy corpses on bloodstained canvass stretchers and carried an equal weight of comrades in olive drab. “There were bodies all over the hill and the odor was bad,” a GI wrote in his diary. During a break the troops swapped cigarettes and family snapshots, chattering about Italian girls and favorite movie stars. An American officer asked auf deutsch, “Wie geht’s bei Hitler jetzt? Wrapped in a slate-blue overcoat, a redheaded sergeant from Hamburg shrugged. “Gut, gut.” Rome was pleasant enough, the Germans advised, but the city could not be compared to Berlin.” From Monte Casino came the rattle of musketry; the local cease-fire was scheduled to end at noon. Auf widersehen, they called to one another, trudging off with a last load of dead. Goot bye. A German soldier trotted forward for a final handshake. “It is such a tragedy, this life,” he said.” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 405.

“By now the American war machine had become the “prodigy of organization” so admired by Churchill and so dreaded by German commanders. U.S. production totals in 1943 had included 86,000 planes, compared with barely 2,000 in 1949. Also: 45,000 tanks, 98,000 bazookas, a million miles of communications wire, 18,000 new ships and craft, 648,000 trucks, nearly 6 million rifles, 26,000 mortars, and 61 million pairs of wools socks. Each day another 71 million rounds of small-arms ammo spilled from U.S. munitions plants. In 1944, more of almost everything would be made.” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 450.

To be continued….

About Michael

Retired military officer; retired Air Force civil servant; retired executive, DS Information Systems Corporation; writer; researcher; reader and avid yachtsman.
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