“Every evil is easily crushed at its birth; become inveterate it as a rule gathers strength.” — Continued…

If we do not facedown Islamic Terrorism now it will continue to grow and there will be hell to pay much like the bill our ancestors paid for WWII, to wit:

Rick Atkinson's Liberation Trilogy, Winner of the Pulitzer Prize
Rick Atkinson’s Liberation Trilogy, Winner of the Pulitzer Prize

 “The war weighed heaviest on the men actually fighting it, of course. Nine months of combat in Italy had annealed those whom it had not destroyed. The fiery crucibles from Sicily to Casino left them hard and even hateful. “After you get whipped and humiliated a couple of times and you have seen your friends killed, then killing becomes a business and you get pretty good at it pretty fast,” one Tommy explained. Plodding up the Italian boot, they left peaceable civilian selves on the roadsides like shed skins.” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 473.

 “A counterintelligence officer noted that combat veterans “are sometimes possessed by a fury that makes them capable of anything . . . It is as if they are seized by a demon.” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 474.

 “From the Tunisian campaign, four U.S. combat divisions had emerged full of killers. Italy crafted many more, American as well as British, Canadian, French, New Zealand, Indian, Polish, and others. Together they would form an avenging and victorious army, a terrible sword of righteousness. A VI Corps officer proposed that every soldier embody the “three R’s ruthless, relentless, remorseless.” As the Abbey and Casino town had been pulverized, so would a thousand other strongholds. God could sift the guilty from the innocent. The war had come to that.” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 474.

 “Accidents alone killed 13,000 U.S. airmen; by war’s end, 140,000 Allied crewmen would be dead.” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 497.

 “A flight leader’s momentary lapse could have catastrophic consequences. One squadron commander, a Hollywood actor named James Stewart, later said, “I didn’t pray for myself. I just prayed that I wouldn’t make a mistake.”” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 497.

 “The Arab soldier is interested in just three things: women, horses, and guns,” a French officer told an American Colonel, who replied, “The American soldier is the same, except that he doesn’t care anything about horses and guns.” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 529.

“With eight Purple Hearts by the end of the war, Bob Frederick would be described as “the most shot-at-and-hit general in American history.”” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 572.

 “[Mark] Clark gave another short address from a second-floor balcony, then slipped into a suite for a private moment. Kneeling on the bedroom floor, he thanked God for victory and prayed for the souls of his men. A hand gently touched his shoulder. Clark turned to find [General Alphonse Pierre] Juin behind him. Beneath his brushy mustache, the Frenchman smiled and said, “I just did the same thing.”” ─ The Day of Battle, The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, Copyright © 2007 by Rick Atkinson, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, Page 575.

 

About Michael

Retired military officer; retired Air Force civil servant; retired executive, DS Information Systems Corporation; writer; researcher; reader and avid yachtsman.
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