Wisdom Concerning ‘The Media’ from the Pre-Political Correctness Age

General Ulysses S. Grant

General Ulysses S. Grant

“Correspondents of the press were ever on hand to hear every word dropped, and were not always disposed to report correctly what did not conform to their preconceived notions, either about the conduct of the war or the individuals concerned in it.” ― Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, published by Konecky & Konecky, New York, Page 213.

“I always admired the South, as bad as I thought their cause, for the boldness with which they silenced all opposition and all croaking, by press or by individuals, within their control.  War at all times, whether a civil war between sections of a common country or between nations, ought to be avoided, if possible with honor.  But, once entered into, it is too much for human nature to tolerate an enemy within their ranks to give aid and comfort to the armies of the opposing section or nation.” ― Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, published by Konecky & Konecky, New York, Page 263.

General Sherman, 1820-1891

General Sherman, 1820-1891

“…overwhelming necessity overrides all law.” ― Sherman, Memoirs, by William Tecumseh Sherman, The Library of America, ©1990 by Literary Classics of the United States, Inc., New York, NY, Page 657.

 “Every attempt to make war easy and safe will result in humiliation and disaster.” ― Sherman, Memoirs, by William Tecumseh Sherman, The Library of America, ©1990 by Literary Classics of the United States, Inc., New York, NY, Page 657.

“Newspaper correspondents with an army, as a rule, are mischievous.  They are the world’s gossips, pick up and retail the camp scandal, and gradually drift to the headquarters of some general, who finds it easier to make reputation at home than with his own corps or division.  They are also tempted to prophesy events and state facts which, to an enemy, reveal a purpose in time to guard against it.  Moreover, they are always bound to see facts colored by the partisan or political character of their own patrons, and thus bring army officers into the political controversies of the day, which are always mischievous and wrong.  Yet, so greedy are the people at large for war news, that it is doubtful whether any army commander can exclude all reporters, without bringing down on himself a clamor that may imperil his own safety.  Time and moderation must bring a just solution to this modern difficulty.” ― Sherman, Memoirs, by William Tecumseh Sherman, The Library of America, ©1990 by Literary Classics of the United States, Inc., New York, NY, Page 899.

About Michael

Retired military officer; retired Air Force civil servant; retired executive, DS Information Systems Corporation; writer; researcher; reader and avid yachtsman.
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